Bibliography

This is intended to be a complete bibliography of Paddy’s books with additional entries for his friends and associates, particularly those who served in the SOE.

Paddy’s Books

The Traveller’s Tree (1950)
The Violins of Saint-Jacques (1953)
A Time to Keep Silence (1957)
Mani – Travels in the Southern Peloponnese (1958)
Roumeli (1966)
A Time of Gifts – On Foot to Constantinople: From the Hook of Holland to the Middle Danube (1977)
Between the Woods and the Water (1986)
Three Letters from the Andes (1991)
Words of Mercury (2003) edited by Artemis Cooper
In Tearing Haste: Letters Between Deborah Devonshire and Patrick Leigh-Fermor (2008), edited by Charlotte Mosley

Audible

“George Psychoundakis: A Letter to C.A Trypanis by Patrick Leigh Fermor” (1999) published by The American College of Greece, Athens

Introductions and Forwards to Other Books

Foreword of Albanian Assignment by Colonel David Smiley, Chatto & Windus, London (1984). The story of SOE in Albania, by a brother in arms of Patrick Leigh Fermor, who was later a MI6 agent.

Foreward to “The Rash Adventurer-a Life of John Pendlebury” by Imogen Grundon, Libri Publications Ltd, 2007. Robert Siebert adds: “His association with  the “almost mythical figure” of Pendlebury is included also in “Words of Mercury” from a speech he gave in May 2001 at Knossos, Crete, in commemoration of the sixtieth anniversary of the Battle of Crete and published in The Spectator.”

An introduction to The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, introduction by Patrick Leigh Fermor, illustrated by Thierry Vernet, translated by Robyn Marsack

PLF wrote the introduction to “Roumanian Journey” (sic) by Sacheverell Sitwell. This account of Sitwell’s relatively brief visit to Romania was originally written/published in 1938, but PLF wrote his introduction for the 1992 paperback edition. He refers to his own travels, and to his visits to the Sitwell home while in army training.

Contributions to Collected Works

More Tales from the Travellers: A Further Collection of Tales by Members of the Travellers Club, London

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8 thoughts on “Bibliography

  1. Tim

    Also a foreword in A British Achilles: George, 2nd Earl Jellicoe KBE DSO MC FRS 20th Century Soldier, Politician, Statesman. They were firm friends and I saw them together with George Psychoundakis at a Remembrance service in Suda Bay Crete many years ago, for the 60th anniversary if I remember correctly. Thw book contains a number of comments about Paddy, including mention of inviting him along as his no 2 to capture Kreipe.

    Reply
  2. Tom Sutherland

    You might want to include, “More Tales From The Travellers”, which includes Paddy’s description of how he became a member of The Travellers Club from a cave in Crete:

    More Tales from the Travellers: A Further Collection of Tales by Members of the Travellers Club, London [Hardcover]

    Sir Chris Bonington (Author), Sir Ranulph Fiennes (Author), Sandy Gall (Author), Patrick Leigh Fermor (Author), Eric Newby (Author), Simon Winchester (Author)

    Reply
  3. Robin Hurford

    The bibliography could include “The Cretan Runner” by George Psychoundakis which is “TRANSLATED AND WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY PATRICK LEIGH FERMOR”

    Reply
  4. Rodica Stefan

    Yet another literary work with a foreward by PLF is “Couleur du monde” (vol. I, Escales de ma jeunesse, vol. II, Heureux qui comme Ulysse…) Éditions Du vieux colombier, La Colombe, Paris, 1955 (vol.I), 1956 (vol.II).
    The English version is “The World Mine Oyster – The Memoirs of Matila Ghyka”, translated from the French by the author, Wiliam Heinemann, London, 1961.
    The Romanian edition is “Curcubeie”, Curtea veche, București, 2003.

    Patrick Leigh Fermor (n.1915) met Matila Ghyka during his staying at Balasha Cantacuzene’s manor in Băleni (today’s Galaţi County in Romania).

    Prince Matila Costiesco Ghyka (born Matila Costiescu Ghica), K.C.V.O., M.C. (September 13, 1881—July 14, 1965), was a Romanian poet, novelist, mathematician, historian, and diplomat, and the Romanian Minister in the United Kingdom during the late 1930s and until 1940. (His first name is sometimes written as Matyla.).
    It’s worth mentioning that Ghyka’s aesthetic theories influenced Salvador Dali who collaborated with the Romanian mathematician when creating the paintings Leda atomica and the Madonna of Port Lligat (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matila_Ghyka and http://ro.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matila_Ghyka).

    Reply
    1. alexandraco46

      Minunata relatare, Rodica 🙂 De saptamini caut sa localizez Baleni. Daca as fi citit acest blog si comentariul tau inainte, multi nervi mi-as fi ferit de tocire :-). Multumesc si numai bine, Alexandra Costide

      Reply
  5. r seibert

    another foreward by PLF is in “The Rash Adventurer-a Life of John Pendlebury” by Imogen Grundon, Libri Publications Ltd, 2007. His association with the “almost mythical figure” of Pendlebury is included also in “Words of Mercury” from a speech he gave in May 2001 at Knossos, Crete, in commemoration of the sixtieth anniversary of the Battle of Crete and published in “The Spectator”.

    Reply
  6. veronique bellavista

    This is my very first book by Patrick Leigh Fermor (A Time for Gifts), and I am so enchanted by it, that the idea of finishing it soon seems very cruel. I am sure I have become addicted to his huge knowledge of history and his poetic and very skillful prose. Thanks heaven I see I can still read many other books of his, and also dive into the General World History and get the big puzzle straight.

    Reply
    1. proverbs6to10 Post author

      Hi Veronique – well you can move straight on to Between the Woods and the Water to complete his journey (what has been published). There are also excerpts from what came after Between the Woods in Words of Mercury – the Black Sea Cave – and in Roumeli where he describes joining in a cavalry charge!

      I have a compulsion to underline sections of his work and then research them later perhaps on Google. It is all very enjoyable.

      Tom

      Reply

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