Tag Archives: Patrick Leigh Fermor Society

Patrick Leigh Fermor Society events March and April

We seem to be turning into a classified ads section for Paddy related events at the moment. It’s one announcement after another. Sorry about that but it just shows that there is a lot going on and it is only fair to give due warning so you can schedule your diaries or even your trans-Atlantic business trip if you happen to be coming this way. The PLF Society have two more events coming up which remain open to non-members in March and April.

Walking across Europe in Paddy’s Footsteps
DATE: Monday 9th March 2015
TIME: 7:15pm
LOCATION: Great Hall, Hellenic Centre, 16-18 Paddington St, London W1U 5AS
Writer and storyteller Nick Hunt, author of Walking the Woods and the Water,
recounts his modern day ‘great trudge’, walking in Paddy’s footsteps from the Hook
of Holland to Istanbul.
RSVP info@patrickleighfermorsociety.org

and …

In association with Pro Patrimonio, The Patrick Leigh Fermor Society presents
A Romanian Romance: Paddy in Transylvania and Moldavia A journey through time
DATE: Thursday 16th April 2015
TIME: 7:00pm
LOCATION: Romanian Cultural Institute, 1 Belgrave Square, London SW1X 8PH
Alan Ogden, author of Romania Revisited, will introduce the evening and briefly describe Romania in the 1930s.

Michael de Styrcea, nephew of Marshal of the Court Baron Ionel Mocsonyi-Styrcea, will then discuss Paddy’s time in Transylvania and the former Banat with illustrations from the Mocsonyi family archive.

The second part of the evening, led by Serban Cantacuzino C.B.E. (the founder of Pro Patrimonio) and his sister, Marie-Lyse Ruhemann, will be devoted to the story of Balasha Cantacuzino, her sister Pomme and Paddy.

RSVP info@patrickleighfermorsociety.org. Please note that the RCI has a capacity of 90 seats.

Advertisements

Curating the Patrick Leigh Fermor archive

David McClay, curator of the John Murray archive

David McClay, curator of the John Murray archive

You may be forgiven for thinking that a lecture about curating Paddy’s archive could be a little dry, but for the one hundred and eighty people who attended last night’s event at the Hellenic Society in Paddington it turned out to be nothing of the kind.

By Tom Sawford

David McClay is the National Library of Scotland’s curator of the John Murray archive. He had travelled down to London to give the inaugural lecture of the Patrick Leigh Fermor Society and it was a great success for both. David led a large team of activists, technicians and photographers who have spent the best part of a year cataloguing and itemising Paddy’s extensive personal collection, and over 6,000 of Joan’s photographs.

We were given a glimpse of some of the material which includes over 10,000 letters and postcards as well as numerous corrected drafts of Paddy’s manuscripts, and surviving journals of his post-war journeys around Greece and other beloved places. The collection takes up over 16 metres of shelving and the catalogue is eighty one pages long. Fortunately Paddy gave David and the team some assistance with his various boxes labelled “Detailed Oddments” or “Not very important oddments” and so forth.

The story of the acquisition is interesting itself. The John Murray archive was donated to the museum in the 1980s and includes material from the authors published by the house including of course Lord Byron, Jane Austen, Charles Darwin and John Betjeman. The catalogue extends to over one million items and may have a value in excess of £100 million. When offered the PLF archive, the decision to purchase was not an instant yes as Paddy had no obvious relationship with Scotland. The decision to go ahead was based upon the relationship with John Murray, in particular John “Jock” Murray VI, and of course the recognition that Paddy’s work was unique and important in 20th century English literature.

Given Paddy’s long life, his varied career, and the circle of friends that he had, many of whom were significant figures in their own right, David McClay’s view is that there is a lot to be uncovered and the material could provide the basis for further biographies. He cited as an example Paddy’s friendship with Greek artist Nikos Ghika; he believes that their correspondence is worthy of publication. Many of the letters include drawings and small paintings by Ghika. The propensity to illustrate letters was common (as we have seen in the letters to Debo Devonshire – see In Tearing Haste), and other examples include those from John Craxton to Paddy: one of Craxton’s letters includes a sketch of the harbour view from his house in Crete. Likewise the guest book from Kardamyli is full of wonderful material and colourful illustrations.

Joan Fermor’s work should not be ignored. David McClay told us that she was a successful architectural photographer with an ability to bring her subjects to life which included many archaeological subjects. As we know she also took brilliant images of their friends.

For the student, biographer, or even just the casual visitor, there are other delightful inclusions such as a copy of Paddy’s beloved friend Xan Fielding’s post-war CV which ran to about 15 lines and included a list of his skills and talents which were:

Fishing with dynamite
Bull fighting
Skiing
Witchcraft
Sailing
Swimming

Clearly a man with all the vital talents to make him employable anywhere!

One of the most important messages to bring to you all, dear readers, is David’s view that this is “your archive”: it is freely available for you to visit whether you be a professional writer, academic or merely just wanting to hold, touch and read the ephemera of Paddy’s life. You are encouraged to visit Edinburgh and can request information. Soon much more will be available online for you to use or just to browse and amuse yourself. This positive drive towards public accessibility was very encouraging, and whilst every care has been taken to ensure that the materials will survive – storage in proper archival folders in acid free environments – the archive is a living entity and to be of any value it must be accessed. McClay made a special appeal for people to come forward with ideas about the origins of certain pictures, including who may have taken them, where and when. Much work still needs to be done and you, his friends and fans, may be able to help.

As well as the storage of the material and the process of digitisation of some items, the Library has plans to publicly display as much material as possible. I will keep you posted about events but David anticipates exhibitions in Edinburgh and then on tour to London. The renowned water colourist Hugh Buchannan has made some paintings of material from the archive which will feature in an exhibition of the Esterhazy Archive. These works will be on display at the NLS in the summer of 2015 and will move to London to be shown at the John Martin gallery in, of all places, Albemarle Street just up the road from John Murray.

It didn’t take long during the Q&A session for the subject of “the house” to come up. Charles Arnold, the leading light behind the PLF Society handled this one. It appears that the Society has engaged a leading law firm as well as accountants KPMG to work with the Benaki to establish a structure for the proper and transparent use of any funds that the Society may donate for the upkeep and renovation of the house at Kardamyli. We wish them luck with that!

The choice of subject for this first PLF Society event was a good one. It covered all aspects of Paddy’s life and reassured us that this valuable and fascinating material will be accessible by all. If you would like to find out more about the work of curating the archive or to help David McClay and his colleagues in the ongoing identification process you are encouraged to get in touch. Likewise if you have material – items received from Paddy – that you may wish to donate (or in some cases sell) you can contact David at d.mcclay[at]nls.uk

Lecture: Curating the Paddy Leigh Fermor archive

General archive itemsThe inaugural lecture of the Patrick Leigh Fermor Society will take place on Monday 19 January 2015 at 7.15pm.

David McClay Curator of the PLF archive (and those of Joan Leigh Fermor and Xan Fielding) at the National Library of Scotland will present the Library’s recent acquisition of Paddy’s extensive and outstanding archives, including their recent activities and future plans at the Hellenic Centre, 16-18 Paddington Street, Marylebone, London W1U 5AS.

All are welcome to attend but for the sake of crowd control please RSVP (and enquiries) as follows:

tel: 020 7563 9835
fax: 020 7486 4254
e-mail: press@helleniccentre.org OR info@patrickleighfermorsociety.org

The Patrick Leigh Fermor Society is launched

Much discussed over the years, the Patrick Leigh Fermor Society has finally been formed by a group of UK-based Paddy enthusiasts, and is associated with the Alliance of Literary Societies. The press release issued by the Society to mark today’s launch follows. Not sure I agree with the estmate of £500,000 to restore the house but who are we to argue with the venerable Benaki? We shall watch the progress of the Society with great interest and hope to support its activities. At this time we wish them every success.

The Patrick Leigh Fermor Society has been formed to bring together the many PLF enthusiasts in this country and around the world. It will organise lectures and other events and plans to publish its journal The Philhellene three times a year.

The stated aims of the Society are to promote interest in the life and works of Patrick Leigh Fermor and to support his legacy, including contributing towards the upkeep of his house at Kardamyli, which he built between 1964 and 1966 on the west side of the Mani peninsula in the southern Peloponnese. The house is a cross between a farmhouse and a monastery, designed by PLF and his wife Joan, built of old stone among the olive groves, under the range of Mount Taygetus.

PLF died in 2011 and bequeathed the house to the Benaki Museum, to be opened as a researchers’ retreat, and the museum estimates that a total of some £500,000 will be needed for its restoration and upkeep. The Society will work closely with the Benaki towards achieving the necessary repairs and other tasks, so that the house can be reopened as soon as possible to fulfil PLF’s wishes.

In addition to devoting a substantial part of its subscription income to the dedicated fund that the Benaki has set up, the Society is inviting individual and corporate Sponsors to make donations of £100 upwards and several potential donors have already been identified prior to the launch of the Society. It is hoped that special arrangements to visit the Kardmyli house will be made for all members of the Society when they are in the area.

The annual subscription for ordinary members will be £20 a year and there is an option to become a life member for £200. The Society is a member of the Alliance of Literary Societies.

The website of the Society is http://www.patrickleighfermorsociety.org.

Enquiries to: Charles Arnold, Director on +44 (0) 20 8579 1948 or Julia Weston-Davies, Membership Secretary on +44 (0) 1451 850128